All About GHB

Drug Class

Sedative

Common Terms

G, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (full name), or GBL (gamma butyrolactone), Gina

Consumption and Standard Dose
  • GHB is typically sold in small vials as a clear liquid with a consistency slightly thicker than water
  • It can be swallowed on it’s own, but is usually diluted in water or juice, and sipped
  • GHB is odourless and doesn’t really taste like anything
  • GBL has a slight salty, chemical taste and smell that can be easily masked when added to other liquids. GBL is a stronger form of the drug.

The Buzz
  • Relaxation, reduction in anxiety, mild euphoria
  • Feeling more sociable and socially confidant or laid-back
  • Increased horniness
  • Drowsy
  • Feels like you are drunk on alcohol, without the bloated feeling of having consumed multiple drinks, and with the benefit of fewer-to-none of alcohols’ hangover symptoms the next day

Overdose and other negative effects
  • Light-headedness, nausea, dizzy, vomiting
  • “G’ing Out,” “G-Nap,” “Going Under.” It is very easy to overdose with G, which renders you passed out. The difference between the high and passing out is minimal. It is among the most common overdoses in Toronto’s clubs and bathhouses.
  • Hard to rowse and wake when G’d Out.
  • Vomiting, disoriented and confused when waking up from a G-Nap
  • Slurred and reduced muscle coordination
  • Breathing problems can happen with too much G, as it slows down the body
  • Blacking Out. Memory loss can happen during under the influence of G
  • Seizures can happen with too much G in your system
  • G’ing Out in dangerous places, such as hot saunas and steam rooms is associated with heart failure and strokes
  • Do not leave people G’d Out unattended. Make sure they are breathing and continue to check this until they wake up.
  • Put them in the recovery position so they do not choke on their vomit.
  • Be extremely cautious with someone who G’s Out with alcohol. Take them to the hospital if their breathing is shallow or slow.
  • Tolerance on G builds up quickly, so you need stronger doses to feel the same effects over time, increases the risk of G’ing Out.
  • Withdrawal symptoms can develop with regular use.
  • Detoxing from GHB-dependence is dangerous, and should be done with medical supervision

Dangerous Drug Combinations
  • Downer drugs like Ketamine, valium, or antihistamines (allergy medications). These can all mix with G to suppress breathing to dangerous levels
  • Alcohol when mixed with G can cause an instant blackout, and fall to the floor, causing injury.
  • Stimulants put pressure on the heart when G is taken with them. We are more likely to overdose on G if taking with stimulants, as we may feel like taking more G to overcompensate a stimulated state.
  • Drugs or medications that affect your blood pressure can be dangerous if mixed with G

Sex on G
  • Lowers inhibitions, similar to alcohol, while boosting confidence and sociability
  • Heightened sense of touch and sensitivity to sensations
  • Some guys experience stronger erections
  • Intense orgasms, though this is dose-dependent
  • Too much G can induce drowsiness and passing out during sex
  • G is considered a “date-rape” drug, as it increases your agreeableness to sexual activities, and decreases your ability to set and assert sexual boundaries. It is extra important to check in with partners who are on G regarding consent. Keep checking in throughout a sexual encounter. Sex with someone who is passed out can be considered sexual assault.

HIV Medications & G
  • Protease and Integrase Inhibitors increase the amount of G in your system, increasing the potential for an overdose, making G’ing Out more likely
  • If G makes you throw up within an hour of taking HIV medication, it is recommended to take your meds again